Preston Springs

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The private property on 102 Fountain Street South, known fondly as the Preston Springs Hotel, had been boarded up and vacant for 30 years.

The City has endeavoured to work with several owners and proposals to restore the troubled building but finding a solution has proved complicated and cost-prohibitive.

Over the course of that time, there have been significant issues in terms of vandalism, safety, trespassing, and keeping the building secured. These problems have further contributed to the condition of the property which was in an advanced state of deterioration and structural decay.

Cambridge is a city rich with history and architecture and it is always the City’s preference to work with private owners to preserve our past and to respect heritage designations.

However, the Chief Building Official felt there was no other option but to issue an Emergency Order to demolish the building in the interest of public safety in December, 2020.

While much of the heritage value had been lost over the years, certain items were salvaged during the demolition.

On January 28, 2021, Council asked staff to report back on 11 options that will further enhance and strengthen heritage protection and conservation practices in the City of Cambridge. Watch the full council meeting here.

As well, Council voted to release a report that was discussed during a closed council session on January 21, 2020. This report and other related materials will be updated in the Documents section on this page.

On this page, you will also find history and background information on the property. Frequently Asked Questions will also be updated.


The private property on 102 Fountain Street South, known fondly as the Preston Springs Hotel, had been boarded up and vacant for 30 years.

The City has endeavoured to work with several owners and proposals to restore the troubled building but finding a solution has proved complicated and cost-prohibitive.

Over the course of that time, there have been significant issues in terms of vandalism, safety, trespassing, and keeping the building secured. These problems have further contributed to the condition of the property which was in an advanced state of deterioration and structural decay.

Cambridge is a city rich with history and architecture and it is always the City’s preference to work with private owners to preserve our past and to respect heritage designations.

However, the Chief Building Official felt there was no other option but to issue an Emergency Order to demolish the building in the interest of public safety in December, 2020.

While much of the heritage value had been lost over the years, certain items were salvaged during the demolition.

On January 28, 2021, Council asked staff to report back on 11 options that will further enhance and strengthen heritage protection and conservation practices in the City of Cambridge. Watch the full council meeting here.

As well, Council voted to release a report that was discussed during a closed council session on January 21, 2020. This report and other related materials will be updated in the Documents section on this page.

On this page, you will also find history and background information on the property. Frequently Asked Questions will also be updated.


Category Heritage Salvage Plan   Show all

  • Heritage Salvage Plan

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    The plan was completed by a firm that specializes in heritage conservation. Their heritage team reviewed the building to create a historic record and provided direction as to which items should be saved for historical significance, this included:

    • Entry fountain
    • Entry door
    • Lobby fireplace
    • Select millwork, doors

    As well, the demolition contractor, with experience in cultural heritage demolition, also retrieved stonework around the fireplace, window trim, the bannisters from the main lobby staircase, stone wall, pilaster at the front entrance, and mosaic tile.


    The tower was not part of the original structure – it was a replica constructed around 1999.

    This is a private property and the owner owns these elements. However, the City will be working with the owner to find options to preserve these pieces.

    Read the Documentation and Salvage Plan.