Updating the Regional Official Plan

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Schematic graphic logo representing growth

What is this project about?

Waterloo Region is growing. Our population is expected to reach 923,000 people and 470,000 jobs by the year 2051, and we want your ideas on how and where to grow! We are currently reviewing the Regional Official Plan (ROP), a key document that guides long-term growth and development in the Region to 2051.

How do I get involved?

We know people living and working in the region are passionate and eager to help shape future community growth. We encourage you to comment on project updates, ask questions or attend a public meeting to have your say.

This page will be updated regularly with project updates and opportunities to interact with the Project Team. Feel free to ask questions using the Q&A tab below.

Visit the Region's ROP main homepage for more information.

What are the key elements of the ROP review?

This review builds on the existing ROP, and will look at:

  • how and where our cities and townships might grow;
  • what kind of housing we should build;
  • how to continue to host a variety of jobs that residents need;
  • how to protect farmland, our environment and plan for climate change.

Stay tuned for more opportunities to share your ideas. If you have questions about the ROP go to the Q&A tab below.

What is this project about?

Waterloo Region is growing. Our population is expected to reach 923,000 people and 470,000 jobs by the year 2051, and we want your ideas on how and where to grow! We are currently reviewing the Regional Official Plan (ROP), a key document that guides long-term growth and development in the Region to 2051.

How do I get involved?

We know people living and working in the region are passionate and eager to help shape future community growth. We encourage you to comment on project updates, ask questions or attend a public meeting to have your say.

This page will be updated regularly with project updates and opportunities to interact with the Project Team. Feel free to ask questions using the Q&A tab below.

Visit the Region's ROP main homepage for more information.

What are the key elements of the ROP review?

This review builds on the existing ROP, and will look at:

  • how and where our cities and townships might grow;
  • what kind of housing we should build;
  • how to continue to host a variety of jobs that residents need;
  • how to protect farmland, our environment and plan for climate change.

Stay tuned for more opportunities to share your ideas. If you have questions about the ROP go to the Q&A tab below.

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Regional Employment Area Map - Draft Endorsed

about 2 months

This map presents the draft Regional Employment Area, which was endorsed by Council on April 21th.  For more information please see the This map presents the draft Regional Employment Area, which was endorsed by Council on April 21th.  For more information please see the Regional Employment Area project update page.



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Proposed Regional Intensification Corridors

8 months

What are regional intensification corridors?

The purpose of an intensification corridor is to increase densities in close proximity to existing and planned transit. For intensification corridors to be effective, they should occur where there is infrastructure to support density, and where intensification can contribute to the development of transit-supportive/pedestrian-friendly areas.  The six proposed regional intensification corridors are intended to work in collaboration with the local nodes and corridors identified at the area municipal level, through the official plans of Cambridge, Kitchener, and Waterloo.

Where are the six proposed Regional Intensification Corridors (corridor in blue on the map, with a 500 metre buffer outlined in yellow)?

  1. Victoria Street between Lackner Boulevard and Central Station
  2. Ottawa Street between Lackner Boulevard and Borden ION Station
  3. Ottawa Street between Mill Station and International Place
  4. Ira Needles Boulevard between Erb Street West and Highland Road West (only if connected to an east-west connection: Erb Street with Caroline St North or Highland Road)
  5. Erb Street and Caroline Street between Ira Needles Boulevard Laurier/Waterloo Park ION Station
  6. Homer Watson Boulevard and Manitou Drive between Fairway Station and Highway 401

Why did we identify these six intensification corridors as regionally-significant?

  • existing population and employment levels;
  • built form and travel patterns;
  • their opportunity to accommodate intensification;
  • their opportunity to connect major destinations; 
  • their ability to support the existing and planned regional rapid transit network; and, 
  • their ability to serve as a future rapid transit corridor.

What would we like your feedback on? Zoom in on the map below and use the COMMENT PIN to let us know:

  1. Are there any other intensification corridors, with regional significance, that we should be considering? Why?
  2. Are there any other factors we should consider when identifying regionally-significant intensification corridors? Why?

To add a comment pin, simply click on the icon and then click on the map where you’d like to you place your comment.  A Comment Form will pop up and you will be asked to leave your comment and your name (it can be your screen name or initials, if you'd prefer).  You can add as many comment pins as you like! Please note that once a comment pin has been submitted, it can then be seen by anyone viewing the map. We will be closing this interactive mapping activity on December 13, 2020.

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Proposed Boundaries around ION Rapid Transit Station Areas

18 days

There are 24 planned ION transit station areas in Waterloo Region. The ION transit station areas are considered Major Transit Station Areas (MTSAs) and the lands within 500 to 800m radius of the stations are the focus of this assessment. The Region is now required to show on maps, within the Regional Official Plan, the boundaries around each ION rapid transit station area that will accommodate the density target of 160 people and jobs per hectare - this target is a Provincial requirement. Each ION rapid transit station area was analysed to assess the potential capacity for growth at full build-out.  

The proposed boundaries for each ION transit station are shown on the map below, and were identified in collaboration with staff from the Cities of Cambridge, Kitchener, and Waterloo.

 Zoom in on the map below and use the COMMENT PIN to let us know:

  • your thoughts on the proposed boundaries - should they stay the same, change, and if so, how and where?  
  • to comment on the transit service, please complete GRT’s online comment form

To add a comment pin, simply click on the  icon and then click on the map where you’d like to you place your comment.  A Comment Form will pop up and you will be asked to leave your comment and your name (it can be your screen name or initials, if you'd prefer).  You can add as many comment pins as you like! Please note that once a comment pin has been submitted, it can then be seen by anyone viewing the map. We will be closing this interactive mapping activity by August 15, 2020.


CLOSED: This map consultation has concluded. Thank you very much for your interest and participation.